Benghazi

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Earlier this week, Speaker John Boehner announced the formation of a new select committee to investigate Benghazi led by Rep. Trey Gowdy.

All three of my brothers served in the military, and I know firsthand how much Americans serving abroad -- and their families -- sacrifice. What happened in Benghazi on Sept. 11, 2012 was a tragedy. Four Americans died putting themselves in harm's way in service to peace, diplomacy, and their country. I look at what happened in Benghazi with sadness, with seriousness, and as yet another call to honor the men and women who keep us safe.

So let me be blunt: that kind of seriousness is sorely missing from the no holds-barred political theater of the House Republicans.  

I know a little bit about the way Trey Gowdy pursues oversight. I was on the other end of it when I was setting up the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and I was called to testify before the House. As the Huffington Post reported at the time, Gowdy's interrogation of me "seemed to lack the basic facts" about the agency he was attempting to oversee. I'd like you to read their reporting on one of these exchanges just so you know what this Benghazi "investigation" is likely to look like:

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) grilled Warren on whether the bureau would make public the complaints it gets. She answered that the complaint issue was a work in progress, but that at the very least, there was progress in creating a system for large credit card companies.

"Are any of the complaints public?" Gowdy demanded.

"Congressman, we don't have any complaints yet," Warren said of the still-nascent agency. "What we're trying to do is build the system."

Gowdy also seemed to think that Warren had written the Dodd-Frank law, and he was determined to know what Warren meant by defining "abusive" practices as something that "materially interferes" with the ability of a consumer to understand a term or a condition.

"That suggests to me that some interferences are immaterial. Is that what you meant by that?" he asked a momentarily perplexed-looking Warren.

"Congressman, I believe the language you are quoting is out of the Dodd-Frank act," she said. "This is the language that Congress has adopted."

Still, Gowdy insisted on her answer, although the definitions and regulations required by the law are still being written.

As a Senator, I take oversight seriously because it is powerfully important. But Trey Gowdy gives oversight a bad name. The House GOP is on a waste-of-time-and-resources witch hunt and fundraising sideshow, shamefully grasping for any straw to make President Obama, former Secretary Clinton, or Secretary Kerry look bad. This stunt does a disservice to those who serve our country abroad, and it distracts us from issues we should be taking up on behalf of the American people.

With millions of people still out of work and millions more working full time yet still living below the poverty line, with students drowning in debt, with roads and bridges crumbling, is this really what the House Republicans are choosing to spend their time on? Even for guys who have so few solutions to offer that they have voted 54 times to repeal Obamacare, this is a new low.  

House Republicans are doing whatever they can to distract the American people from what's really going on in Washington – a rigged system that works great for those who have armies of lobbyists and lawyers but that leaves everyone else behind. A system in which Republicans protect tax breaks for billionaires while they block increases in the minimum wage for millions of people who work full time and live in poverty. A system in which Republicans give away billions of dollars in subsidies to Big Oil while making billions in profits off of our kids' student loans.

It's wrong, and it's shameful.

Meet our volunteer: Dan Futrell

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Dan Futrell - Elizabeth WarrenLast Fall, Somerville resident Dan Futrell, a decorated Iraq veteran with five years of active duty in the Army and two Bronze Stars, got involved in his first political campaign to support Elizabeth Warren.

Futrell, who was drawn to Elizabeth's message that "No one succeeds on their own," says, "I believe we are responsible to ourselves and to each other. In the military, you are a member of a team. You will succeed or fail together. If you see your battle buddy fall down, you stop and help him up. And I see that as a bigger responsibility - we must apply that military concept to the broader issues of society."

Dan Futrell - Elizabeth Warren"I don't think Scott Brown is a bad person," Futrell says. "He's just not pointing us in the right direction as a nation. Elizabeth understands the responsibility we have toward one another, and she understands that this responsibility is not optional. For instance, she's done a lot to help veterans. At the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, she hired Holly Petraeus to look out for issues that specifically affect veterans."

With Vietnam veteran Bill Dooling, Futrell put together Vets and Military Families for Warren. "We support her because we know she's on our team," Futrell says. Together they are growing the veteran outreach and organizing military families across the state.

Veterans looking to help the campaign can sign-up through:  http://elizabethwarren.com/groups/veterans.